Books

Freeing Fortune with Ashley J. Barner & Jennifer Sanders

Ashley J. Barner & Jennifer Sanders

Give us the one to two sentence tagline for your book.

Pulling him out of the book was an accident – putting him back in may break her heart.

What surprised you the most while writing this book?

How easily the plot rolled out for the first draft – we felt more like narrators than creators.

Why did you pick the setting you used for your book?

My co-author Ashley has spent years as a grad student, so the university was a natural fit. And we are both lovers of the Regency era.

What is the sexiest trait of your hero?

I think his enthusiasm about the real world and his delight in learning new things are Ben’s most appealing features.

What is your favorite scene/moment in your book?

I love the part when Linnea has to enter the book-world herself to save Ben’s life. We really enjoyed figuring out what ‘fiction-land’ would be like.

What scene did you have to cut but wish could have been included?

We had a scene where Aunt Virulea was lecturing poor Araminta about the lessons to be learned from Beauty and the Beast that we both thought was really funny. Unfortunately it didn’t really fit anywhere, in the end, so we cut it.

Tropes get a bad name, but they’re often the biggest draw for readers. What tropes do you love to write and read?

Friends to lovers, for sure. Also Meant To Be or Soulmates. I also enjoy a Strong Heroine.

What are your favorite genres/sub-genres to write in? Are there any you love to read but cannot write in?

We love urban fantasy as well as Regency. We’ve also dabbled in the Victorian era. And we’ve discovered that we can’t write epic fantasy at all!

Which do you love to write best: dialogue, setting, action, love scenes, or other?

Dialogue, for sure.

Which do you hate to write: dialogue, setting, action, love scenes, or other?

Big complicated fight scenes are always a struggle.


Freeing Fortune


An Excerpt From Freeing Fortune

Fortune ran his fingers through his hair. “I must get back, I must—if I am not there, who can say what will happen to her?” He turned wide, dark eyes on her. “You must help me—you must help me return!”

“Of course,” Linnea said, putting her hand on his arm and glancing up at Susan, who raised her eyebrows at the tableau. “I’m going to search through the papers until I find the right spell,” she promised, knowing even as she said it that she might never get through all the papers, and that the spell might not exist. But she was certainly going to try. “We’ll get you back to her. And maybe this time you’ll decide to be honest with her about your feelings.”

“Decide to be—to whom do you refer? I assure you, I have hid my true feelings from no one, except where rudeness forbids.” Linnea all but rolled her eyes. He was being coy. Typical Fortune.

“It’s all right, we know,” Susan said gently. “You don’t have to hide it from us. You’re in love.”

He could not have looked more astonished if she’d pulled a salmon from behind her back and smacked him across the face with it. “I assure you, Miss Hu, I am heart-whole. I believe I would know better than you.”

“No, really,” Linnea added. “We know all about Araminta.”

“Ara—” His rather patrician nose actually wrinkled. “Araminta Cavanaugh? You cannot mean her.”

“Yes,” Linnea insisted. “We know you’re in love with Araminta Cavanaugh.”

He stared at them. “But—I detest the silly girl!”


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